Week 13 – Neuro-otologists – the specialists

I can’t tell you the relief I felt to finally get my appointment at University College London Neuro-otology Department.  Despite all the effort of travelling into London on the underground with vertigo and new hearing aids,  it was all worth it because finally I was being seen by people who knew what they were doing and who seemed to have time for me.

I was passed through a series of tests specifically designed to assess my balance and hearing. These included rotary chair testing, various audiometry tests and Continue reading

Week 11 – My first techno-ears and the END of the ENT

By the end of the next week I just couldn’t cope without a hearing aid and decided it wasn’t an option to wait a minute longer for the NHS to provide me one. Over the last few weeks I’d gone for free consultations with a few private hearing aid centres in my area and had already gathered info on packages and prices. They all seemed to give money back guarantees so I decided to go for it and spend £3,500ish to help me with this new experience of isolating deaf-tinnitus. I was fitted with my new pair of Phonak Q90’s from Boots and was absolutely delighted Continue reading

Week 4 – Sudden Hearing Loss

This week I found out that any sudden, noticeable reduction in hearing should be treated urgently as a medical emergency. It should be treated with the same importance that sudden blindness would be. So how come this is not the case in the UK’s NHS?  In order to have a reasonable chance of saving someones hearing, high dose corticosteroids (either tablet or injection) need to be given ideally within 72 hours (but also can be effective up to 1 month). Why do I observe that this is happens for people abroad but not for us in the UK?  

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